SILVERSEA CRUISES –
EDUCATIONAL MEDITERRANEAN MARVELS II

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129
Ship: Silver Dawn
Availability : APR 8-18, 2022
Barcelona, Spain
Civitavecchia (Rome), Italy

INCLUDED IN THE CRUISE FARE 

  • Economy Class Air – Roundtrip
  • Transfers (between airport and ship)
  • 1 Shore Excursion per port, per day
  • Spacious suites – over 80% with private verandas
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Personalized service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship. 
  • 24-hour dining service
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Onboard gratuities

Itinerary & Excursions

  • 10 PORTS

  • 4 COUNTRIES

Start in the jumble of streets and style of Barcelona before stopping off in Porto Mahon, Palma and Palamos – where you’ll enjoy an extra-long stay in port. France’s famous Riviera welcomes you next. Tick Marseille, St. Tropez and glitzy Monte-Carlo, home of the famous F1 race off your list of European hot spots before Italy and a night in Tuscany beckons. Portofino and Rome finish this lovely Mediterranean wander.
Barcelona, Spain – The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí’s majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain’s second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona’s vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Porto Mahon, Spain – Happy to sit out of the limelight that Ibiza and Majorca bathe in, Menorca lives life at its own pace, offering endless pine-tree fringed beaches and an appealing, mellow approach. The capital of Menorca is a bashful member of Balearic Islands, which wait off of the sunny Spanish coast. With atmospheric old towns, tiny fishing villages, and unspoiled beach coves, this is one of the group’s lesser-known and explored gems – and all the richer for it. A UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, there are wetlands and rolling sand dunes with diverse wildlife to explore – and 220 different birds soar and wade within. The designation helped to halt the threat of overdevelopment, and with gloriously clear waters and leisurely boating trips to enjoy, Porto Mahon welcomes you to a wonderfully preserved and characterful island. The island’s capital spills around the Med’s largest natural harbour, which sprawls out for three miles. Wander the whitewash town’s streets, heading for the hubbub of the fish market – to sample the best of the day’s freshly prepared haul. The majestic organ that fills the interior of Santa Maria church with over 3,000 pipes is a sight to see and can produce a wonderful, gut-vibrating noise. Filled with pottery and cake shops, there’s an artsy, laid back and creative atmosphere to Porto Mahon’s streets. Swing a golf club, and crack drives through the salty sea air of Porto Mahon, or rumble along the paved bike paths that ring the island exploring between wildflower sprinkled fields and stone walls. Or, head straight for the many beaches and turquoise seas, which are blotched with dark blue patches. When it’s time for a sit down in the shade, order up a refreshing pomada – gin and lemonade – before settling on your sandy nook of choice, to watch the setting sun sinking into the warm of the waves of the Mediterranean.
Palamos, Spain – A place of monasteries tucked into mountains, surreal art, and gorgeous beaches, Palamos is your gateway to the Costa Brava’s scenic beauty, and the cultural wonders of Catalonia. Inspect Palamos’ rugged coastline, and you can almost see the Catalan flag’s blood and gold colours reflected in the craggy red cliffs and golden sands. Soak in the unfiltered glory of Spain’s Wild Coast, which is fringed with attractive beaches and rock-dappled outcrops lunging into the blue Mediterranean waves. Known for its rich, meaty prawns, Palamos is a flavourful stop of culture, coastline and historic charm. Just 20 miles inland from Palamos’ tempting beaches, you’ll find Girona’s Medieval city looming. Four rivers converge here, in this delightfully walkable city. Soak up the atmosphere of the cobbled old town, which is protected by historic ramparts. A steep ramp of 90 steps leads up to the Baroque façade of the Cathedral of Girona, which towers over the city and impresses with the world’s widest Gothic nave – a full 22 metres across. Figueres is also close by, where you can enter the ‘theatrical dream’ conceived by the master of surrealism, Salvador Dalí. Born in Figueres, his hometown honours his memory and global influence at the irresistible Dalí Theatre-Museum – a gloriously bizarre and immersive experience, and a fitting summation of his creative outlook. Opened in 1974, Dalí himself had an input into the design of the giant egg topped building, having worked on its creation during the final decade of his life.
Port Vendres, France – Midi-Pyrenées is France’s largest region, spreading from the Dordogne River in the north to the Spanish border in the south. Port Vendres, only 10 miles (16 km) from the Spanish border, is located on the coast that is known as the Côte Vermeille. The port had its heyday in the 19th century with colonial trade and ferries plying the route to and from North Africa. For cruise vessels, Port Vendres provides the opportunity to visit some of the prettiest areas of France. It serves as a convenient starting point for trips to the medieval town of Carcassonne. Other towns that may be worthwhile exploring include Collioure and Banyuls. The latter is famous for its sweet wine and as the birthplace of sculptor Aristide Maillol.
Marseille, France – France’s sunniest and oldest city may not have the glamour of some of its Cote D’Azur neighbours, but what it lacks in glitz, it certainly makes up for in authenticity and cultural depth. France’s second-biggest city, Marseille served as European Capital of Culture in 2013 and is a fantastic hub of museums, creativity and colour. The Le Panier district is a vivid illustration of this – with its faded streets revitalised by overflowing flowerpots and pretty naturally-distressed doorways. Look down to the yacht-crammed port – where fishermen still unload fresh catches – from the viewpoint at the spectacular Notre-Dame de la Garde – a true crowning glory. Standing over walled fortifications – and capped by an elegant dome – the soaring golden statue of Madonna and Child rises high into the air and is visible all over the city. The huge Marseille Cathedral is equally impressive, with its stunning zebra-striped exterior. Palais Longchamp, built-in 1862, twinkles with flowing water, and its saturated gardens and splashing fountains were built to celebrate the engineering feat of successfully redirecting water to the city. You can’t leave Marseille without tucking into its famous fish stew – bouillabaisse. Flavoured with thyme, garlic and hunks of Mediterranean fish and plump prawns, it’s a bold and delicious taste of Provence. Wash your hands clean after, with some of Marseille’s traditional soap, created using a fragrant recipe of rich olive oil. Escape the hubbub of the city, to soak in the natural glory of Calanques National Park. Hike, kayak and sail your way through a treasure trove of limestone cliffs, dropping off to hidden beaches.
Saint Tropez, France – A glitzy, glamorous coastal resort that needs no introduction, Saint Tropez is the French Riviera hotspot of choice for A-listers and flotillas of gleaming yachts. The sparkle of its beaches, and clarity of its light, continues to attract artists – but it was the famous presence of Brigitte Bardot that leant Saint Tropez its enduring glamour and steamy appeal. Nowadays, speedboats skim offshore, while fine vintages from the vineyards nearby are uncorked in top-notch restaurants, in this well-heeled highlight of the Cote d’Azur. Famous bars offer views of the port along Quai Jean Jaurès, with its iconic cherry-red directors’ chairs. Here you can admire the monstrous wealth of yachts that sparkle on the waters. On the same corner, big-name brand labels glimmer in the shops of rue François Sibilli – which cuts inland from the charming waterfront. The earthier appeal of boules clinking and thumping into the ground can be enjoyed at Place des Lices, where sun-wrinkled locals compete. Saint Tropez has a few beaches of its own, but famous stretches like Pampelonne Beach draw the biggest crowds to relax on star-studded golden sands. La Ponche, the authentic fishing quarter, retains its cobbled, historic elegance, and a 17th-century, hexagon-shaped citadel watches over the city and coastline from above. Coastal walks in the sea air snake away from the city’s bustle, and a series of headlands shape the stunning riviera landscape surrounding Saint Tropez. The historic monochrome Cap Camarat lighthouse adds a pleasing accent to hikes above the sparkling Mediterranean’s waves.
Monte Carlo, Monaco – Glitzy, glamorous and unashamedly luxurious – live the high life in Monte Carlo. From the super-yachts jostling for position in the harbour to the lavish bars splashing out iced champagne, tiny Monaco’s only city is a high rolling, decadent affair – and a gloriously indulgent, sun-soaked taste of the good life. Famed for its low tax status – and the Formula One race that roars through its hairpin bends and tight streets each year – Monaco is the ultimate playground of the rich and famous. Monaco may be the world’s second-smallest country – only the Vatican has a smaller footprint – but Monte Carlo has a confidence, impact and appeal that few can match. The gilded Royal Palace adds an air of regal glory, and whether you want to soak up the culture at the opera or raise the stakes at a casino – doing your finest 007 impressions – you’ll feel very much at home here. Soar above the high-rise hotels and glorious casinos in a helicopter, to see the city from above, and admire landmarks like the cathedral where Grace Kelly married the Prince of Monaco in 1956. High-end fashion, fragrances and fancy adornments await in the gold-label shops of Monte Carlo’s lavish shopping streets, while the old town’s pink and lemon floral facades offer an authentic balance of historic character to counterpoint the well-heeled excesses. A wonderful escape, revel in old-world glitz and glam, as you admire twinkling chandeliers and wander between palatial architecture, while enjoying your time in Monte Carlo’s abundant wonderland. Before you leave, explore the storied fortress that protected this tiny state’s independence for so long.
Livorno (Tuscany), Italy – There are few more elegant places to salute the sunset than Terrazza Mascagni, Livorno’s refined chessboard piazza. A historic port, and a beachy gateway to Tuscany, Livorno welcomes you ashore to explore this enchanted Italian region’s sun-soaked beauty, rich flavours and world-renowned fine art. Stay in Livorno to explore ‘Piccolo Venezia’, or ‘Little Venice’ – a quarter of the town that’s laced with canals, little marble bridges and plenty of tempting eateries. With its bustling market, fortresses and iconic waterfront, there’s plenty to keep you busy here, but most will be tempted to venture inland to explore more of Tuscany’s many charms and artistic wonders. Test your nose, as you breathe in the subtleties of Tuscany’s vineyard-draped scenery, and visit wineries showcasing the best of the renowned flavours of the Bolgheri wine-growing area. Or head out to Prato, where you’ll find tightly-woven textile history. Pisa’s showpiece tower is within reach, as is Florence’s city of immense and imaginative renaissance beauty. Admire the delicate carving of Michelangelo’s masterpiece, the David statue, and note the provocative stance as he casts a dismissive glance towards Rome. Stand before the city’s majestic black and white cathedral – the Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore – with its colossal brick dome. The view down over Florence’s river and grand dome from Piazzale Michelangelo, meanwhile, is one of Italy’s finest. However you choose to spend your time in Tuscany, you’ll discover an artistic region, filled with beauty designed to appeal to every sense.
Livorno (Tuscany), Italy – There are few more elegant places to salute the sunset than Terrazza Mascagni, Livorno’s refined chessboard piazza. A historic port, and a beachy gateway to Tuscany, Livorno welcomes you ashore to explore this enchanted Italian region’s sun-soaked beauty, rich flavours and world-renowned fine art. Stay in Livorno to explore ‘Piccolo Venezia’, or ‘Little Venice’ – a quarter of the town that’s laced with canals, little marble bridges and plenty of tempting eateries. With its bustling market, fortresses and iconic waterfront, there’s plenty to keep you busy here, but most will be tempted to venture inland to explore more of Tuscany’s many charms and artistic wonders. Test your nose, as you breathe in the subtleties of Tuscany’s vineyard-draped scenery, and visit wineries showcasing the best of the renowned flavours of the Bolgheri wine-growing area. Or head out to Prato, where you’ll find tightly-woven textile history. Pisa’s showpiece tower is within reach, as is Florence’s city of immense and imaginative renaissance beauty. Admire the delicate carving of Michelangelo’s masterpiece, the David statue, and note the provocative stance as he casts a dismissive glance towards Rome. Stand before the city’s majestic black and white cathedral – the Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore – with its colossal brick dome. The view down over Florence’s river and grand dome from Piazzale Michelangelo, meanwhile, is one of Italy’s finest. However you choose to spend your time in Tuscany, you’ll discover an artistic region, filled with beauty designed to appeal to every sense.
Portofino, Italy – Effervescent and exclusive, Portofino rests on a privileged peninsular. Lavish yachts mingle together, seeking out sought-after berths in the harbour, while gelato drips onto the stone-paved streets in this, the most alluring and glamorous town of the Italian Riviera. This section of the Ligurian Coast is a protected area, and home to some of the country’s most picturesque, and jaw-dropping scenery – which is best viewed from the deck of a sailing boat. Crisp white villas roll out across the verdant green hillsides, surrounded by laden vineyards and olive groves. Down in Portofino itself, the buzz of chatter and the clatter of cutlery, provide the soundtrack to busy terrace bars and restaurants, which serve up fine food and delicious sea views. Portofino’s achingly beautiful harbour arcs around the lapping waves, with a warmly-hued waterfront of peach and apricot colours – which also adorns postcards and promotional travel guides of Italy. For the authentic Portofino experience, sail out onto the tranquil waters of the Gulf of Tigullio, to mingle amongst the privileged at play, or settle back in the shade as you take aperitivo on the picturesque waterfront Piazzetta. Here you can sip the famous Ligurian wines, and stave off hunger with focaccia con il formaggio – or platters of fine cheese and hams. Deeper into Portofino, you’ll find artisans crafting their wares and weaving together lace, or you can ascend to viewpoints like the lemon shaded Church of San Giorgio, to look over the pretty jumble from up above. A wander out along the headland to the tapering tip of the peninsular, rewards with the views of Portofino’s iconic white lighthouse beaming out light and welcoming ships to this slice of Riviera heaven.
Civitavecchia, (Rome), Italy – All roads lead to Rome, and with good reason – this city is one of the world’s most thrilling, offering unmatched history along every street. An evocative, inspiring and utterly artistic capital of unrivalled cultural impact, Rome is a city of back-to-back landmarks, which will take you on an exhilarating journey through the ages. This may be one of the world’s oldest cities, but it’s well and truly lived in. The ruins are punctuated with murmuring cafes, and the outdoor seating of restaurants sprawls out across piazzas, enticing you to sample tangles of creamy pasta and crispy pizzas. Rome’s incredible Roman Forum is littered with the ruins of its ancient administrations, which have stood firm for 2,000 years, since the times when the area was the centre of the Western world. Few sites are more simultaneously beautiful and haunting than that of the storied Colosseum, which looms deep into Rome’s rich blue sky. Take a tour to learn details of the grisly goings-on within. The best way to experience Rome is to wander its streets, gelato in hand. There is a lot to see here – whether it’s the domed spectacle of the Pantheon, or the elaborate flowing waters and artistry of the Trevi Fountain. Vatican City is an astonishing, colossal display of Catholic grandeur, while the Spanish Steps – crowned by the Trinità dei Monti church – offer a beautiful spot to gather and soak up the lively atmosphere of this humming city. With so much on the to-do list, you’ll relish the breaks you take, enjoying simple pleasures like a strong espresso, or fresh pasta with tomato sauce and ripped basil.